Fayette County Clinic:
Washington CH, Ohio

Phone 740-335-6935
Crisis 740-335-7155

Floyd Simantel Clinic:
Chillicothe, Ohio

Phone 740-775-1270
Crisis 740-773-4357

Highland County Clinic:
Hillsboro, Ohio

Phone 937-393-9946
Crisis 937-393-9904

Lynn Goff Clinic:
Greenfield, Ohio

Phone 937-981-7701
Crisis 937-393-9904

Martha Cottrill Clinic:
Chillicothe, Ohio

Phone 740-775-1260
Crisis 740-773-4357

Pickaway County Clinic:
Circleville, Ohio

Phone 740-474-8874
Crisis 740-477-2579

Pike County Clinic:
Waverly, Ohio

Phone 740-947-7783
Crisis 740-947-2147

 

 


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Non-Stigmatizing Messages Boost Mental Health Services Support


HealthDay News
Updated: Apr 13th 2018

new article illustration

FRIDAY, April 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A non-stigmatizing message about serious mental illness (SMI) can increase public support for investing in mental health services, according to a study published online April 1 in the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law.

Emma E. McGinty, Ph.D., from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, and colleagues conducted a randomized experiment involving 1,326 participants in a nationally representative online panel. Participants were randomly allocated to a control arm or to read one of three narratives about SMI emphasizing violence, systemic barriers to treatment, or successful treatment and recovery.

The researchers found that narratives emphasizing violence or barriers to treatment were equally effective for increasing the inclination to pay additional taxes for improvement of the mental health system (55 and 52 percent, respectively, compared with 42 percent in the control arm). Stigma was increased only for the narrative emphasizing the link between SMI and violence.

"For mental health advocates dedicated to improving the public mental health system, these findings offer an alternative to stigmatizing messages linking mental illness and violence," the authors write.

Abstract/Full Text